• Cultured Catsup – or – Fermented Ketchup

    by  • March 3, 2014 • Fermented Foods, Gluten-Free, Vegetarian • 4 Comments

    Before we start, what do you call it, ketchup or catsup?

    fermented ketchup cultured catsup

    Making ketchup has been at the back of my mind for quite a while now.  I had read about a girl in our community who makes her own and I was like I can do that!  So now I did.  Turns out it’s not much work, you just need to have an afternoon where you can leave a couple jars or cans of tomatoes slowly cooking down on the stove.  My recipe is fairly standard, and similar to the one linked above.  However, I use only local ingredients in my ketchup, and allow it to ferment a bit, taking inspiration from Sandor Katz:

    The revival of fermentation at the local and regional scale goes hand in hand with the revival of local agriculture in the movement toward relocalization of our food and our economics.

    -Sandor Katz, The Art of Fermentation, p.369

    truly homemade ketchup

    Of course projects like this raise the question of “why bother?”  Well, I bother partly just because I can, but also because I like knowing what’s in my food and where it came from.  I know the farmer that grew the onion, some of the tomatoes came from our backyard, the vinegar is from apples we pressed into cider last fall, the maple syrup and honey are from local farms, and there are no mystery ingredients!  But ultimately it’s about taste, this ketchup is really super tasty.  Sadly I didn’t make a huge batch, so maybe next time I’ll double this one.

    The Process:

    Cook the canned tomatoes for a long time over low heat, stirring a few times every hour.  You can use a slow-cooker, I just used a Dutch oven over very low heat.  Let them cook for 4-8 hours, however long it takes to get them thick.  If they are not sufficiently uniform puree them in a food processor or with an immersion blender.

    truly homemade ketchup

    While the tomatoes are cooking dice the onion and soak it in the vinegar to infuse it with some oniony goodness.

    After the tomatoes have reached your desired thickness cook them a bit more.  Then add 1 cup of the onion-infused vinegar along with the honey, maple syrup, garlic, mustard, salt, and cook 15-20 minutes more.  Remove from heat and allow to cool.

    truly homemade ketchup

    When the ketchup is cool mix in the rest of the vinegar and the whey.  Transfer to a jar and allow to ferment at room temperature for 1 or more days.  Then store in the fridge.  You can even transfer it to a store-bought ketchup container in hopes of fooling your kids who may have a preference for how ketchup “should” taste….

    truly homemade ketchup

    truly homemade ketchup


    Cultured Catsup - or - Fermented Ketchup
     
    Prep time
    Cook time
    Total time
     
    Homemade ketchup is so good, but fermented is even better!
    Author:
    Ingredients
    • 2 litres/kg tomatoes, pureed (2 canning jars)
    • 100g (roughly ¼ - ⅓ cup) honey
    • 100g (roughly ¼ - ⅓ cup) maple syrup
    • 1 ½ cups raw cider vinegar
    • ½ cup whey
    • 1 small onion, finely diced
    • 1+ tsp. garlic powder
    • 1+ tsp. mustard powder
    • Salt
    • Other seasonings you think would taste good…
    Instructions
    1. Cook the canned tomatoes for a long time over low heat, stirring a few times every hour. You can use a slow-cooker, I just used a Dutch oven over very low heat. Let them cook for 4-8 hours, however long it takes to get them thick. If they are not sufficiently uniform puree them in a food processor or with an immersion blender.
    2. While the tomatoes are cooking dice the onion and soak it in the vinegar to infuse it with some oniony goodness.
    3. After the tomatoes have reached your desired thickness cook them a bit more. Then add 1 cup of the onion-infused vinegar along with the honey, maple syrup, garlic, mustard, salt, and cook 15-20 minutes more. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
    4. When the ketchup is cool mix in the rest of the vinegar and the whey. Transfer to a jar, cover loosely and allow to ferment at room temperature for 1 or more days. Then store in the fridge. You can even transfer it to a store-bought ketchup container in hopes of fooling your kids who may have a preference for how ketchup “should” taste….

    Cultured Catsup -or- Fermented Ketchup on Punk Domestics

    About

    Preferring to refer to himself in blogland as "The Kitchen'r," Jon is a stay-at-home dad, who up until a year ago was a Spanish teacher. He loves cooking, brewing beer, gardening, playing music, and living life from scratch.

    http://localkitchener.ca

    4 Responses to Cultured Catsup – or – Fermented Ketchup

    1. Sande
      March 5, 2014 at 9:10 pm

      This sounds lovely. However, I live alone so can you tell me how long will it keep in the fridge? Thank you.

      • Kitchen'r Jon
        March 5, 2014 at 10:35 pm

        It ought to keep as long or longer than a store-bought ketchup. With all the vinegar and the culturing it should keep at least a few months! And you might as well make a half batch if it’s just for one person, hope this helps :)

        • March 6, 2014 at 10:44 am

          Yes it helps, thanks for your response.

    2. Pingback: Weekly Cultured Gathering: July 12

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